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 Thursday, October 18 2018 @ 21:12 CEST

Using IPSec in Windows 2000 and XP

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SecuritySecurityfocus.com has started a three-part series on using IPSec on Windows 2000 and XP. The focus here is on setting it up, and getting it to work.

Since IPSec is a standard of sorts, knowing IPSec will make you a high coolness-factor person on many platforms, not just the Redmond one. I suggest you go and get yourself a good read. If you never get around to actually implement IPSec anywhere, you will at least know a few new buzzwords.

IPSec is available on OpenBSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, Linux, probably lots of Unix systemsm, Windows and surely lots of others.
 
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Proactive mail security, the tough nail way

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SecurityThis easy solution to the ever returning Outlook Express virus infected mail nightmare, should have been thought of looong ago. Although a bit on the expensive side, and a teeny weeny bit of work to set up, it's the simplest solution thus far for stopping Outlook Express spreading havoc amongst us non-MS-mail-client guys.

I know this solution, it would have worked :-)
 
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Building an E-mail Virus Detection System for Your Network

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SecurityThis article from Linux Journal explains how to make sure that your mail server(s) and gateway(s) don't participate in the spreading of viruses.
 
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Please don't use that thing. Ewwwk!

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SecuritySeveral ISP's in the US of A reportedly tells its customers to stop using their personal firewalls.

Why?

Because the support people have a hard time troubleshooting whatever problem the customer might have, and because it fouls up the ISP's connectivity tests and statistics gathering.

The last part about stats and testing might be true. My cable ISP sends me copious amounts of strange packets all the time, presumably just so they can know whether I'm on or not. Or whatever. Their packets die in front of my firewall anyway. I see no reason whatsoever accepting this kind of "snooping" traffic. Besides, my contract with the ISP doesn't mention anything on firewalls or what kind of equipment I'm allowed to set up. If it eats DHCP, it's up.

Should broadband ISP's ban software or hardware from their lines just because their support people doesn't understand the technology involved?

Take a look at Businessweek Online for the whole article.
 
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Stealthing around the net

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Security
Thomas C. Greene of The Register explains in layman terms how you do "Do-it-yourself Internet anonymity". If total paranoia isn't your cup of tea, you can still follow most of the tips in the article to maintain a low-key presence on the net.
 
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Personal firewalls are 'futile'

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SecurityFrom BSDvault:

"Security researchers have highlighted a potential shortcoming with personal firewall products.

To alert users of the presence of a Trojan or privacy threatening program running on their systems, personal firewalls have been adapted so they monitor and block outbound traffic (as well as blocking inbound network traffic).

[...]

However if a malicious program modifies a DLL used by Internet Explorer to make an outbound connections to port 80 on its behalf then this protection is bypassed."

Read more one BSDvault.

 
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Sneaking out through the firewall

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SecurityWe all know that blocking in- and outbound traffic on specific ports and from specific programs can be accomplished using personal firewalls. After installing one, you'll start feeling safe and have warmfuzzy feelings. But what happens when a trojan hooks on to your browser or other software, and starts to phone home in the process space of your trusted application? It's been mentioned before, but it hasn't been done until now.
 
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UNIX Security Checklist v2.0

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SecuritySeen on BSDatwork.com:

"The Australian CERT has published a paper that details steps to improve the security of Unix Operating Systems. We encourage system administrators to review all sections of this document and if appropriate modify their systems accordingly to fix potential weaknesses."

The full paper can be found here.

 
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bin Laden and the toilet of doom

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SecurityApparently, there's a new Outlook-only mass mailer virus out there, named after the infamous Saudi badboy/playboy. It comes to your inbox sporting subjects like "Bin Laden toilette paper!!", "Sadam Hussein & BinLaden IN LOVE" or "Is Osama Bin Laden BAD-LOVED?".
 
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Answer to Microsoft's "Information Anarchy"

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SecurityElias Levy, former moderator of BUGTRAQ, answers Microsofts Scott Culp over his recent essay on www.microsoft.com. Where? On securityfocus.com.
 
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