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 Sunday, November 19 2017 @ 09:40 CET

Openmoko - CAD files for handsets

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HardwareOpenmoko has released the CAD files for the handsets so that anyone now can download the files and design their own case for the handset. Well done, Openmoko!

More articles about openmoko on this site.

 
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old gear: Palm V

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HardwareToday I found a Palm V in working condition in a pile of junk. It runs Palm OS Software 3.3 and comes complete with cradle (serial connection), flip cover and stylus. It is currently sitting in its cradle recharging the battery. I'm wondering what use I can get out of it. With PalmRemote (shareware) it can be used as an infrared remote control, or I could install Linux (Palm Linux Environment) on it. It is possible to connect a Palm V to a FreeBSD machine, a Linux machine, and probably more. I could run OnBoard C or SmallBASIC on it (or does SmallBASIC require Palm OS 5?). If I wanted to control other machines from the Palm V, I could install PalmVNC on it. I wonder what else It could be used for?
 
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OpenPCD

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HardwareDo you need a RFID reader? Have a look at OpenPCD.org. And to complete your kit, check out the OpenMRTD.org, RFIDIOt, rfdump.org projects.
 
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AMD quad core - Phenom

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HardwareQuad core processors are the rage right now. AMDs new Phenom line is interesting, the line includes both dual, triple an quad core processors. Only a few of them are released yet. The article AMD Phenom 9500 Linux Performance from Phoronix tells you about performance and stability, the good, the bad and the rest.
 
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AlphaGrip - your next typing device?

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HardwareIs the AlphaGrip your next typing device? The current model is called the AG-5. What is it exactly? According to the FAQ at the website (AlphaGrips.com) the AG-5 is, at its core, a USB keyboard and mouse. It works with any operating system or device that supports standard usb keyboards and mice. The AG-5 generates all the characters of a standard keyboard except for Scroll Lock and SysRq. The downside is (of course) taht you will need to spend some time to learn touch typing with this device. And as most of the keys are on the underside (backside) of the device, you will need to do touch typing, because you can't see the keys. But the company claims it is easier to learn touch on the AG-5 than on a qwerty keyboard.
 
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OpenMoko - working GPS driver released

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HardwareWe have previously written about the OpenMoko project. Progress on the software side is steady and good, working phone (call etc.) was reached a few weeks ago. Today, it was reported on the community mailinglist that the GPS driver has been released. Nice!
 
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RFID Guardian

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HardwareThe RFID Guardian Project is a collaborative project focused upon providing security and privacy in Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) systems. The namesake of our project is the RFID Guardian: a mobile battery-powered device that offers personal RFID security and privacy management. One the focuses of our project is to build an RFID Guardian prototype.
(via Boing Boing)
 
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DIY minicomputer runs Minix

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HardwareLinuxDevices.com reports on a DIY minicomputer running Minix: Bill Buzbee offered the first public demonstration of the Minix OS -- a cousin of Linux -- running on his homebrew minicomputer, today at the Vintage Computer Festival in Mountain View, Calif. Magic-1, built with 74-series TTL ICs using wire-wrap construction, implements a homebrew, 8086-like ISA. According to Buzbee, the Magic-1 contains more than 200 ICs, interconnected by "thousands of individually wrapped wires." Rather than using a commercial microprocessor, Buzbee created his own microcoded CPU that zooms along at 4.09 MHz (yes, that's MHz, not GHz), and is "in the same ballpark as an old 8086 in performance and capabilities," he says. Additionally, it "supports user and supervisor modes, address translation via a hardware page table, six external interrupts, and up to 8 MB of memory (currently has 4 MB)." Further details on Buzbee's homebrew CPU and minicomputer are available on the Magic-1's website.
 
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RedPost/Kit - DIY 19 inch picture frame

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HardwareRedPost/Kit from RedPost is interesting:
  • 19" LCD monitor
  • Customized Damn Small Linux
  • 200MHz fanless x86 CPU
  • 802.11 b/g Wifi
in other words a DIY picture frame that you can hack. The Red Ferret Journal has an article on it, suggesting you run things like SlickrFrame on it. USD 549.- doesn't sound too pricey either.
(via Linux.com)
 
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x86: What's with the 3Gb memory barrier?

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HardwareFrom Ask Dan comes What's with the 3Gb memory barrier? which is a nice explanation of why you can't use all of your 4GB RAM if you are running a 32 bit operating system on your machine. Nice to know.
 
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