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 Thursday, June 29 2017 @ 00:48 CEST

Building your own CNC machine

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HardwareIf you want to build a CNC machine, engadget have the article How-To: Build your own CNC machine (Part 1), Part 2 and Part 3. Such a machine will be useful for constructing mechanical parts for your other hardware projects.
 
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LinuxBIOS - A truly GPLed Free Software BIOS

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HardwareWe first wrote about it in the article Projects to create Open BIOS code in 2004, here is a new, short article on LinuxBIOS: LinuxBIOS - A truly GPLed Free Software BIOS. It even have a a video of LinuxBIOS booting (requires Flash).
(via RootPrompt.org)
 
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MAKE Controller Kit

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HardwareIf you're a DIY person, or like to tinker with electronics and microcontrollers, the MAKE controller kit might be for you. It is a complete ARM7-based microntroller board, with USB and ethernet connectivity, 8 10-bit analog inputs, 8 digital outputs, 4 standard servo connectors, 4 LEDs, and more. The development system is available for Windows, Mac and Linux. All sources are provided. Cost is about USD 150.-
 
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Incredible projects: The Heath Robinson Rube Goldberg Computer

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HardwareThis is an incredible project. From IBM developerWorks comes The Heath Robinson Rube Goldberg Computer, Part 1: Implementing a computer using a mixture of technologies from relays to fluidic logic. And I suspect it will be fun too.
(found via RootPrompt.org)
 
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Linux-ready Firmware Developer Kit

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HardwareThe Linux-ready Firmware Developer Kit is a tool to test how well Linux works together with the firmware (BIOS) of your machine. The main component of the kit is a bootable CD. Download the CD and find out how Linux-friendly your hardware is!
 
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Do-It-Yourself Robots with Linux

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HardwareExcellent source if you are interested in building your own robots: Do-It-Yourself Robots with Linux from LJ. Some of the comments are valauable too, but you can skip reading when the comments drifts out of subject..
 
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Introducing the Open Graphics Project

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HardwareThe article Introducing the Open Graphics Project comes to you from Free Software Magazine, and the opening paragraph starts like this: "One project that I’ve been following quite closely lately is a project started by chip-designer Timothy Miller, called the Open Graphics Project. His goal, along with the rest of the project, known as the “Open Graphics Foundation” is to make a 3D accelerated video card which is fully documented, free-licensed, and open source."
Pretty cool, eh?

My take:
With many of the current players in todays graphics market doing a less than satisfactory job of supporting open source operating systems (with freely available and complete specs, and opensource drivers without closed-source parts ("binary blobs")), everybody can see that the need is there.

(found via OSNews)

 
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Hardware diagnostics with open source tools

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HardwareFrom NewsForge, Hardware diagnostics with open source tools is a nice article describing tools that are available to test your hardware. As always, read the comments, there are some good advice in them as well. In addition to the tools mentioned, I like to keep a standard FreeBSD install CD available (or floppies), it will quickly give me an overview of the hardware in an unknown box, and the degree of compatibility (with FreeBSD). I really love the feature that allows me to scroll back the console buffer, so I can look at lines of the output that are offscreen.
 
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The KuroBox

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HardwareFrom the web site: The KuroBox is a small-footprint Linux-based embedded platform for a personal server.

The current incarnation of the KuroBox, the KuroBox/HG, sports a 266Mhz PowerPC processor, 128MB of RAM, 2 USB 2.0 Ports, and a 10/100/1000Mbit network interface.

The KuroBox comes without a hard drive, but can hold any standard IDE (parallel ATA, not SATA) 3.5" drive. The KuroBox runs on a Linux kernel, and has multiple options for actual distribution. Actually, any Linux distribution that supports PPC will work, but so far the community has ported over Gentoo, Debian, Fedora and Sylver's Distro (which is the current incarnation of the Kuro's original embedded distribution).

To give you a rough idea about the KuroBox/HG's power, it can transcode (decode and then re-encode to another bitrate) MP3's using LAME at about 25% faster than realtime. While not as fast as today's modern PC's, this is coming from a box that uses 17 Watts of juice. The tiny onboard fan (used to dissipate the hard drive's heat) is ultra-quiet at 22dB.

 
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engadget builds a HTPC

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HardwareHow-To: Build a practical HTPC from engadget gives you their view on how to build a HTPC for about USD 1000.-
(via RootPrompt.org)
 
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