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 Sunday, October 21 2018 @ 02:31 CEST

No go: The 5mx and the Apacer 96Mb CF

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Psion PDA
By Tor Willy Austerslått

While the 16Mb internal memory on the Psion 5mx holds silly amounts of data, you occasionally need to transport bigger files from point A to B, and that's why I went out and bought a 96Mb Compact Flash memory card from Taiwanese memory maker Apacer.
 
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Stealthing around the net

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Security
Thomas C. Greene of The Register explains in layman terms how you do "Do-it-yourself Internet anonymity". If total paranoia isn't your cup of tea, you can still follow most of the tips in the article to maintain a low-key presence on the net.
 
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E-mail since 1971

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NewsThis year, it's 30 years since Richard Tomlinson sent the first e-mail message on ARPANET, using the now famous '@' as an indicator that the message was supposed to end up on another machine. In 1971, Tomlinson was working (and still is) for Bolt, Beranek and Newman, a contractor hired to work on ARPANET for the US government. He was, as the case often is, supposed to have been doing something else when "inventing" e-mail.

In 2001, Tomlinson got himself a Webby award for his early work on e-mail. Morse, Marconi, Bell and Tomlinson?
 
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Itanium flunking Compaq server tests

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HardwareIntel's Itanium processor is failing to pass Compaq Computer's stress tests, according to a Compaq representative, thus holding up the release of Compaq's Itanium servers.

A Compaq representative said that the company has experienced "sightings" with Itanium, Intel's 64-bit processor for servers, in Compaq's internal testing of its ProLiant DL590/64. The representative would not go so far as to call the issue a flaw, but said the problem appeared to be caused by the processor. The problem crops up with servers running both the 733MHz and 800MHz version of the chip.

Read the full story over at Cnet.

 
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Opera 6.0 for Windows Beta 1 released

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WindowsIn connection with COMDEX, Opera Software ASA has released Opera 6.0 beta 1 for Windows. Among the new things are the ability for users to choose between Multiple Document Interface (like it's now) or Single Document Interface (ála Netscape). Also, Opera now displays non-Latin characters, meaning Asian users can use Opera with their native character sets. There's an extensive list of new features in the press release.

You can download Opera for free right away. The free version has advertising, and a version without the ads will set you back USD39. Upgrade from Opera 5.x is free.
 
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PsiLinux on Psion 5mx

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Psion PDAThe PsiLinux project (formerly known as linux-7110) now has PsiLinux booting on the Psion 5mx. From the progress page:

"The project has come a great distance since the kernel was first booted mid-way through December 1998. That breakthrough lit the path for further development in much the same way that Linus Torvald's did when he got the kernel booting on Intel PCs.

 
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Windows XP Home? No network for you!

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Windows
Just in case you haven't found out yet, Windows XP Home edition doesn't support anything useful when it comes to networking, either in you SOHO or company. This is an excerpt from "Windows 2000 Magazine update", a weekly e-mail newsletter for subscribers. It's written by Paul Thurrott:
 
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Getting a scanner to work under FreeBSD

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FreeBSDBy Torfinn Ingolfsen

My latest experience with FreeBSD was getting my scanner to work. I have a quite ordinary (but cheap) Agfa flatbed scanner which is connected to my machine with an USB cable. The scanner is an AGFA SnapScan 1212U, now discontinued. The only software Agfa has for this scanner is called ScanWise. Not a bad program, but it is only for Windooze. So I was very interested to see if I could get the scanner to work with free software.

 
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Personal firewalls are 'futile'

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SecurityFrom BSDvault:

"Security researchers have highlighted a potential shortcoming with personal firewall products.

To alert users of the presence of a Trojan or privacy threatening program running on their systems, personal firewalls have been adapted so they monitor and block outbound traffic (as well as blocking inbound network traffic).

[...]

However if a malicious program modifies a DLL used by Internet Explorer to make an outbound connections to port 80 on its behalf then this protection is bypassed."

Read more one BSDvault.

 
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IE5.5 and 6.0: Your cookies can be read by anyone

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WindowsMicrosoft has published a new security bulletin - MS01-055 - which in short tells that the cookies stored on your computer can be read by anyone who sends you a special URL, either through e-mail or on a web site. As usual, only Outlook Express and Outlook users with either IE 5.5 or IE6.0 are affected. With this, Microsoft has published over 50 security bulletins for the Internet Explorer/Outlook Express/Outlook family of software since february of 1998. Will it ever stop?

Why is this bad? This is bad because if you ever used your credit card to buy something online, chances are that your credit card number, your billing address and other personal data might still be stored in the cookie that the online store placed on your machine.

Microsoft claims the publication of the vulnerability has been handled irresponsibly, by going public a few days after notifying them. Oh dear oh dear.

It's time for you to switch to Opera and Poco. For a measly $65, you will spend a lot less time on Windows Update, plus you'll sleep a lot better knowing that most - if not all - vulnerabilities of this kind will go someone else's way.
 
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